Poison Girl by Dior

The history of the Poison collection begins in 1985, year when the house at 30 avenue Montaigne released a perfume with a slightly provocative allure. First of all there’s the name: Poison, already a foreboding omen. Then there’s the flask: a concoction captured in an apple-shaped bottle, the very archetype of the forbidden fruit. It wouldn’t take long for Poison to set tongues wagging. This scent is indeed the ultimate tool of seduction – just a few drops would be able to bring an entire crowd to its feet with the carnal facet that’s intimately multiplied within its wake.

That’s how Poison Girl begins, with the invigorating scent of orange. This hesperedic note confers it a profound dynamism and instantly awakens the senses of all those who dare travel in its wake. Then, the scent constructs itself and takes a particularly feminine turn. An enormous bouquet of flowers composed of May roses, cultivated in the Grasse region of France, as all as Damascus roses. The latter, symbol of an elegance that Monsieur Dior himself long worked with, brings a glamorous touch to the perfume. Finally the endnotes of Poison Girl arrive, more enveloping than the first upon contact with Venezuelan tonka bean that here gives off a velvety aspect. Incarnated by Camille Rowe, this scent is finding success with the nouveau elegant!

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